The Camel that Wasn’t There

I’ve never liked camels- not that I deal with them on a regular basis, mind you. Last year I saw one at a summer fair and never realized that they have blue eyes! Very ugly on a brown animal. They spit too! Nonetheless they are valuable for their adaptations to desert life. Seems like they’ve plied the sands for eons.  Even mentioned in the Bible: the patriarchs were travelling around Canaan on camels over a millennium earlier, all the way back in 2100 BCE. For the Bible sez…

Seems that this biblical stuff is all mythical. What do psychologists call it?  Something about attaching the present to the past. When the Bible was written around 600 BCE, camels were everywhere. The biblical authors assumed that the camel had been just as widespread in the time of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob and, as a result, the authors incorporated the camel into their stories.

A new scientific report says that camels weren’t domesticated in Israel until hundreds of years after Abraham, Isaac and Jacob are said to have wandered the earth. Oops! Inerrancy of the Bible. Using radiocarbon dating of camel bones that showed signs of having carried heavy loads, Israeli archaeologists have dated the earliest domesticated camels to the end of the 10th century BCE. None earlier.

The fundamentalists will deny the science here, naturally, while the atheist will revel in the news. It is no wonder why fundamentalists bash science. If science discoveries continue at the present pace, soon their book, written by God, will be little more than pulp fiction.

 

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3 thoughts on “The Camel that Wasn’t There

    1. I ‘bash’ pretentious boobs mostly with an occasional sand-kick on fundamentalists. Regarding the South, I try to enlighten folks an the fact that the past is often prologue.

      The Truth will set you free!

  1. Hello Muddy,
    Damn cell phone….Smart Phone my ass…

    Many Jewish scholars today admit that what was written in the Old Testament was nothing more than Myths, Fables, Parables, and Fairy Tales.

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