Dems Problem with Minimum Wage

post by UptheFlag

 

It appears that Democrats have a problem with increasing the minimum wage.  Since
the time of FDR Democrats have been supporters of the minimum wage.  Wait a minute!
Is that true or a myth?  
 
The principal author of this blog has recently mentioned religious myths.  There are also  
political myths.  If we look at the minimum wage issue objectively, the Democrats are
sorely lacking in passing minimum wage cost of living increases.  To be sure the Dems
mouth increasing the minimum wage, but their legislation has been sorely lacking.
Today, the minimum wage is like $7.25, and it has been that for about 30 years.  Really?
30 years!  How much of that time did the Dems control Congress and or the White House?
 
Now, lately the President has been using his bully pulpit to attack the House and,
therefore, the GOP over enacting minimum wage  increase.  It is good to see that, but for
what avail as the House will be controlled by the GOP thru 2014.  The President has said
repeatedly that if Congress doesn’t act on important issues, he will.
 
By Executive Order The President can set incoming wages for federal workers, and this
includes employees of construction contractors.  Obama has been asked repeatedly to increase
their minimum wage to what he wants, $10.10, and repeatedly he has denied it. 
 
So, is Obama going to do more than threaten to use his executive powers to grant minimum
wage increases or will it just be another play on words?  Unfortunately, it seems that the
latter will happen.  Obama and Dems have been whining about the minimum wage issue for
not just the past few weeks but for 30 years and have not done anything substantively about
it.  
 
It seems likely that the President and Democrat office seekers prefer to have the real
political issue instead of solving the problem.  Yep, here it is again, “not a dimes worth
of difference” , eh.  In either case neither one wants minimum wage legislation, ideology
and political whinning is more important than an immediate wage increase.

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8 thoughts on “Dems Problem with Minimum Wage

  1. If I might insert a notion here, not all Dems are the same.

    Further, in arguing FOR a minimum wage, previously there was not the hard research that provided the clear benefits. The argument back and forth that raising the minimum wage would hurt business and actually cause a reduction in jobs has not been an argument for which there is the clear and unequivocal rebuttal that we have now.

    Obama appears to be an economically savvy President, and while I don’t doubt the previous lip service in support of raising the minimum wage has been sincere, now it is better factually supported so that it can go beyond just verbal support to legislative support.

    NOW if there isn’t a good old fashioned battle to enact minimum wage increases — which is bipartisan supported — then it is more than fair to point an accusatory finger at the left.

  2. It’s always good to use actual facts when discussing a topic.

    “Today, the minimum wage is like $7.25, and it has been that for about 30 years.”
    FACTS:
    Jan 1, 1981 @$3.35 for all covered, nonexempt workers
    Apr 1, 1990 @$3.80 for all covered, nonexempt workers
    Apr 1, 1991 @$4.25 for all covered, nonexempt workers
    Oct 1, 1996 @$4.75 for all covered, nonexempt workers
    Sep 1, 1997 @$5.15 for all covered, nonexempt workers
    Jul 24, 2007 @$5.85 for all covered, nonexempt workers
    Jul 24, 2008 @$6.55 for all covered, nonexempt workers
    Jul 24, 2009 To Present @$7.25 for all covered, nonexempt workers

    “By Executive Order The President can set incoming wages for federal workers, and this includes employees of construction contractors.’
    FACTS:
    The minimum Federal wage for construction workers varies by the type of work performed and the geographical region where the work is performed, not set by the President. The wage is also figured on the combined cost of hourly wage plus hourly cost of benefits. Currently in Northwest Ohio the minimum Federal wage runs between $40 to $90 per hour.

    “Now, lately the President has been using his bully pulpit to attack the House and, therefore, the GOP over enacting minimum wage increase. It is good to see that, but for what avail as the House will be controlled by the GOP thru 2014.”
    FACTS:
    Just because a majority may control both houses and the Presidency, it doesn’t mean they can pass whatever they want. And having control of both houses and the Presidency at the same time is rare.
    HOUSE – The bill can be hung up by the Speaker refusing to bring it to the floor for a vote (can we say John Boehner). It may also be held up in committee.
    SENATE: A very small group of Senators can stop a bill by just threatening a filibuster (can we say Tea Party).
    PRESIDENT: A sitting President my either sign a bill or veto the bill. To sign a bill into law the President must first get the bill from Congress. A Presidential veto can be overridden by Congress, but that has rarely happened.

    ” How much of that time did the Dems control Congress and or the White House?”
    FACTS:
    Majority of votes doesn’t mean control of either House of the Presidency. HOUSE: In 2012 there were over 3% more votes cast for Democrats, but there are over 15% more Republicans.
    SENATE: Each state sends two senators to Washington, now matter how large or small the state’s population. More rural states tend to prefer Republicans while more populated states prefer Democrats; and that’s why the Senate may change in 2014.
    PRESIDENT: Not elected by popular vote, but by the Electoral College. Electoral votes are based on state population (Representatives) plus two (Senators) and many states allow the party getting the most votes to take all the Electoral College votes. In my lifetime, Nixon and Gore both lost after getting the most votes.

    These are just a few of the quirks that make our government what it is today.

    1. The imbalance of Representatives in the House is a result of high tech gerrymandering by Republican controlled state legislatures. Ohio had a chance to fix this in 2012, but both political parties in the state didn’t let that happen.

  3. Yes, Ohio voters HAD the chance, but they were hoodwinked by the language of the ballot- language purposely complex and cumbersome- language constructed by GOP operatives to defeat the issue. Pathetic, as usual.

  4. “Minimum Wage History

    A federal minimum wage was first set in 1938. The graph shows nominal (blue diamonds) and real (red squares) minimum wage values. Nominal values range from $0.25/hr in 1938 to the current $7.25/hr. The graph adjusts these wages to 2012 dollars (red squares) to show the real value of the minimum wage. Calculated in real 2012 dollars, the 1968 minimum wage was the highest at $10.51. The real dollar minimum wage (red squares) falls during periods Congress does not raise the minimum wage to keep up with inflation. The minimum wage increased in three $0.70 increments–to $5.85 in July, 2007, $6.55 in July, 2008, and to $7.25 in July 2009. The 2012 minimum wage is equal to what was paid in 1960.
    Many states have departed from the federal minimum wage. Washington’s minimum wage is highest, advancing to $9.19, January 1, 2013, and Oregon’s is second at $8.95.

    [graph]
    Multiplying the minimum wage by a work year of 50, 40-hour weeks gives the annual earnings that can be expected from a minimum wage job. The real annual income from a minimum wage job is the blue bars. The red line is the poverty level real annual income for a family of four. Minimum wages have never been sufficient to raise a family out of poverty, if only one member of the family works.
    [graph]
    The minimum wage has varied from a maximum of 90% of the poverty level in 1968 and has averaged two thirds of the poverty level since 1959, when the poverty level was established. The the lowest percentage the annual income from the minimum wage has been of the poverty level was 2006, just before Congress raised it for the first time in a decade. This is the longest period during which the minimum wage has not been adjusted
    [graph]
    As minimum wages have declined in real terms, the percent of workers covered, too, has declined. Over 130 cities now have “living wages.”
    [graph]
    “Minimum Wage Coverage” is the percentage of workers receiving minimum wage. Sources: U.S. Bureau of the Census; U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics; Statistical Abstract of the United States; and Survey of Current Business.
    For details: Smith 1989″

    I take your criticism, NON. What I was trying to say is that in the last 30 years the minimum wage has not kept up with inflation and the current
    $10.10 proposal of a Democratic Party and President doesn’t either.
    For the sack of discussion I said 30 years, not wanting to go back to1938
    when FDR set it at $0.25. $10.10 doesn’t that for even 25 cents!

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