White Vote-Fixing in North Carolina

I’m not sure how the governor of North Carolina could lie so easily to his state and the rest of the nation as he signed a very restrictive, new voting law for the state. Or, am I naive about politicians? It was, naturally, aimed at people of color and other non-whites in his state to lessen their impact in future elections. The Republican governor called it “common sense reforms,” and said it will help ensure the “integrity” of the voting process. What a joke; what a lie!

No doubt the GOP is hoping that North Carolina stays red in 2016 as it barely did in 2012. President Obama barely won the state in 2008. With these new laws in place, the state has a much better chance of maintaining its red color and white vote.

Asians and Latinos are increasing in population in the state and that worries the GOP. Thus, the ‘vote fixing’ regulations to insure that the white vote dominates.

In addition to a requiring a photo ID to vote, the new law eliminates a week of early voting, end same-day registration, and prohibit “out-of-precinct” voting.  GOP governor McCrory also said residents “overwhelmingly” support the “common sense” law. Overwhelmingly? Apparently the governor talks exclusively with his GOP friends.  Folks in rural areas of the state clearly would not support such limiting voter rights. The governor used the standard GOP talking points when he compared the new law with buying Sudafed- you need an ID to purchase the medicine.  Oranges and apples, but that doesn’t matter.

What matters is that the new law will disenfranchise tens of  thousands of NC voters. That is what matters to the GOP. In today’s Toledo Blade, the editorial board cautioned the Ohio Legislature not to copy what the Republican legislature did in North Carolina. They wrote,  Ohio’s election system needs reform, not voter suppression — and lawmakers need to appreciate the difference.  Well, sadly GOP legislatures all throughout this state and across the nation got the memo a few years ago. The memo that says, and I paraphrase: We white Republicans are a falling demographic and unless we find ways to suppress the non-white vote, we’re history!

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19 thoughts on “White Vote-Fixing in North Carolina

  1. Seriously? Tens of thousands of “voters?” Who are they, these disenfranchised ones? Would they have voted whether they had ID or not? Do they care about what happens in government, or are they more concerned with surviving one more day? Did they have a limo pick them up by the car full last election to take them to the polling places?

    Some use the argument that the “very poor, minimum wage worker” cannot get an ID because s/he can’t afford to take the 5 hours off that it takes to go stand in line at DMV to get the ID. Hmm. There’s a problem with that logic. They didn’t get a job without an ID. They can’t cash their minimum wage checks without an ID. They can’t have signed a lease without an ID (I’ll concede they might be homeless by HUD standards). The point is, what’s the problem with requiring an ID, when in fact you have to have an ID for almost everything except spitting on the sidewalk?

    And why on earth does it take us three weeks to vote? Seriously? The first election I got to vote in I had to be registered 60 days in advance, and I had a 12 hour window. I was an eighteen year old without a car and with a minimum wage job who lived out in rural America. And I managed just fine. Why do modern Americans need THREE WEEKS?

    Or maybe the disenfranchised everyone’s so concerned about cannot get a photo ID because they’re not eligible? Maybe that’s what people are dancing around? And maybe they need so much time so they can re-register with a different party, or at least they could, before the new legislation passed?

    But here’s the other question I can never get an answer to: If this is such a problem, why are we complaining about it instead of making an effort to get these tens of thousands of NC “voters” who have no ID some sort of photo ID? After all, it would be good for much more than just voting! They could enroll in social programs, and drive cars and cash checks and go to work and all the things we white folks of privilege take for granted.

    1. Actually, Ms. Miller thinks for herself, but I think that’s neither here nor there. It appears that instead of addressing real questions directly, Mr. (?) Mudrake has chosen to make it personal. I find that curious.

      Not really.

      1. Ms Miller thinks for herself. Good for you.

        1. Who are these disenfranchised voters. They would be the rural poor voters, many of whom have neither a car, a driver’s license nor means of getting to the DMV. Have you travelled through rural NC?

        2. Why no ID?many rural Blacks didn’t have jobs requiring IDs. Do you know much, Ms Miller, about rural black life? Do you know much about Latinos and Hispanics?

        3. Why 3 weeks? Why not? Is there something sacred about a ‘quick’ voting period?

        4. Why is there no action on this problem? First, there WAS no problem to begin with. What the GOP legislature and governor did was to propose a solution to a non-problem. How many cases of voter fraud were there in NC in 2012, 2008? A handful out of millions of votes cast.

        The whole concept is a joke, but you seemed to have walked right into the trap set by the GOP propaganda machine.

  2. A couple of things:

    First, elections have consequences. In Ohio and North Carolina the
    GOP won the last elections in those States. Voting is a political
    exercise, the voters chose Gop legislatures and Governors, they make
    the laws as long as they rare the majority.

    Second The Constitution is fairly clear on who sets the rules of voting for President and Vice President. In article !! Section one Paragraph 2 says “Each state shall appoint, IN SUCH MANNER
    AS THE LEGISLATURE THEREOF MAY DIRECT, a number of
    electors……

    The States set the rules for federal election, not the Federal
    Government. Therein is the problem. So, elections do have
    consequences…..

  3. Good morning Muddy. Thanks for the laugh this morning.
    ” Do you know much, Ms Miller, about rural black life? Do you know much about Latinos and Hispanics?”
    Come on Brother, you do? LOLOL. I know I don’t. I’m more white urban. Now I don’t agree withe the elimination of early voting or the registration. But I have no problem with voters having to show ID. Maybe it’s something I take for granted, but I have had an ID since I was 16. I can’t imagine anyone not having one. But you’ve made this point before and so have other left leaning bloggers. But you said it yourself, “How many cases of voter fraud were there in NC in 2012, 2008? A handful out of millions of votes cast.”
    It is my opinion that our electoral process is so important, that even one fraudulent vote is unacceptable. Voter ID requirements could end this. I think I have an idea in regards to the rural voters with no car and no access to a DMV, or elderly with no means to get to a DMV. How about expanding some of the services offered my the Postal Service? I just found out that some country’s Post Offices have some banking abilities. Why not give ours the ability to do State IDs? Say every six years. I’m sure Cheyenne might not agree with that. But at least that way, everyone could have an ID.
    What do you think?

  4. How about our social security card? Ooops, that’s too easy! Most have one already, even out in the backwoods, or the Mississippi Delta, in rural Ohio,
    and the inner cities. So, is it really about fraud or about limiting the vote of
    minorities who tend to vote Democratic?

    However, early voting is troubling. Nixon was easily beating Humphrey
    in 1968, but in the last rwo weeks of that campaign people began to see
    through Nixon and he barely won. Carter was ahead by 10 points the weekend before the election and lost. McCain had Obama beat until he
    blundered in October by saying there was nothing wrong with the
    economy. Rommney lost it with his 47% comment. Truman was a goner
    in 1948 until Dewey laid back at the end. Timing is important in a campaign
    and before people vote it should run its course it seems to me.

    How is restricting the registration of 16 and 17 year olds restricting their
    right to vote? They have no right until 18 per the Constitution! I registered
    for my social security card at 16, for the draft at 18, and to vote at 21. Why
    sould voting be any different?

    1. ” So, is it really about fraud or about limiting the vote of
      minorities who tend to vote Democratic?”

      For me, it’s about fraud. I’m not about to speak for Tea Party politicians and their reasoning(?). But I was listening to a radio program where they were discussing these I.D. laws. The guest on the radio show was saying that these laws could effect the elderly, more than minorities. If this is true, is it possible that these laws could hurt the GOP more than help them? A few elderly retired folks that live by me voted for Romney.

      1. I believe there are several demographic groups affected by ID laws, but not all “elderly” are equally affected. Elderly, rural blacks seem to be special targets of these laws. Urban elderly blacks and Hispanics are targeted as well.

        When I worked on lit distribution during the early voting process in ’08, I saw many elderly urban voters who I discovered were first-time voters. They registered and voted the same day. Naturally, GOP operatives in the various states are working hard in 3 areas to keep this group away from the polls:

        1. Voter ID
        2. No same- day registration
        3. Short or no early voting

        Those elderly black men and women who came to vote in ’08 and stood with their children and grandchildren to vote early for Sen. Obama deserved to cast their vote, especially after having suffered much racial discrimination all throughout their lives.

        Nuff said.

  5. I could accept your concern about fraud a little more, JOB, if you agreed to an easy method of having an appropriate ID, like a Social Security card.

    As to voting time, how about Amending the Constitution from the first Tuesday in November to Sunday and make it a national holiday? And have
    total federal control over the national voting process. No state financial
    responsibility!

    1. ANOTHER Federal holiday! More government intrusion into our lives!

      Great idea, but the tea-drinking zombies would shriek to high heavens over this.

      1. Two words Muddy. Patriot Act.
        I don’t understand the benefits of making it a national holiday. But I don’t see a problem with making it Sunday.
        As far as Tea Party members. Photo ID requirements is a great idea. But we have to insure that everyone can get an ID.

    2. An appropriate ID would have to be photo. Social Security card would not suffice in my opinion. That’s where my Post Office idea comes into play. The postal service goes everywhere. We can implement a photo ID system through the post office and it’s mail carriers. And we could do it for a nominal fee.
      I would easily agree with changing the day to be on Sunday. I’ve often wondered why it is on Tuesdays.
      I still think states should flip part of the Electoral “bill”. Especially when it comes to Senators, who are elected to represent the state.

      1. I believe that it was on Tuesdays to discourage the non-elites from being able to vote. The historian can answer for this question.

    1. Wikipedia: 1845, the United States was largely an agrarian society. Farmers often needed a full day to travel by horse-drawn vehicles to the county seat to vote. Tuesday was established as election day because it did not interfere with the Biblical Sabbath or with market day, which was on Wednesday in many towns.

  6. Well, the “kid”, lol, will be on a coast to coast talk health radio show today.
    I will be interviewed and commenting on my recent cardio treatment
    and cost. It’s the Dr. Joel Wallach, “Dead Doctors Don’t Lie” program.

    It was just one of those word of mouth happenings. A friend here mentioned
    me to a friend in Memphis, from there to Nashville, and from there to the
    home offices in Santa Cruz, CA.

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